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Therapeutic Massage and RVing

Laurie Holmes
(Pompano Beach, Fl USA)

Laurie the Therapeutic Masseuse  at Home in Florida

Laurie the Therapeutic Masseuse at Home in Florida

Does your back ache from all that traveling?

I want to be able to travel and go see my family who are spread all over the U.S and be able to do my job which is Therapeutic Massage (Florida Licensed and Nationally Certified with over 24 years of experience...and yes, I'm that good!!!).

Do you think I would get enough work in RV camps and parks to be able to afford to stay on the road maybe full time?

I'm living in Florida, which is where I work, and could come back and winter here if full time on the road won't pay my expenses.

I have not gotten an RV, yet, but hoping to have one in the next few months.

Laurie Holmes

Comments for Therapeutic Massage and RVing

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On The Road Therapeutic Masseuse

Hi Laurie,

The full-time RVing lifestyle tends to lead to fewer medical problems, including fewer general aches and pains, than does a traditional lifestyle. It could be the lack of stress. It could be that the seats in both motorhomes and the trucks used to pull travel trailers and fifth-wheels are better designed for back support than your typical household chair. So, to answer your first question: No, RV traveling doesn't equate to sore backs.

As to your second question, regarding whether or not you would find Therapeutic Massage work in RV parks, that answer isn't as clear cut. A lot of it depends on the type of RVing facility.

You use the term "RV camp," which sounds to me like a place young families with young children go for a week or two during their summer vacation. RVers at these campgrounds are likely to be fishing, swimming, and actively busy outdoors. While a parent certainly might enjoy a massage, I doubt there would be either the time or the money for it.

On the other hand, if your focus is on destination RV resorts, I think you'd find a very open clientele. Many of them have a wide assortment of amenities on the premises. Senior parks, where the residents have the time and the money -- and the need -- for a massage, might be especially worthwhile.

Since you are licensed and nationally certified, you might also find work through staffing services that specialize in placing medical workers. These placements would be short-term, and could allow you to enjoy travel and the full-time RV lifestyle, but the work would be away from the park.

I Asked the Same Question About Doing Thrarpeutic Massage!

Hi Laurie,

I asked the same question and got quite a different answer. I found a guy online that does travel and does massages from his RV. He said he was licensed nationally and only worried about licenses when he was going to be in a place a few months or longer...but didn't say otherwise.

I'm guessing that a few days to a week in a place they probably wouldn't bother you as long as you had a national license. I haven't gotten a clear cut answer yet though. I think as long as you are traveling they wouldn't bother you.

I keep checking back for answers here, and saw your question and decided to say hello. Seems we both want the same thing and I haven't gotten a RV yet, either. Still wants questions answered first.

I'm not interested in working in a RV park for months on end--I want to travel and just stay in a place for a few days to a week at a time. Let me know if you get any answers.


More On Therapeutic Massage and RVing

There's another thread about doing therapeutic massage and RVing, too. Here's the link:

Massage Therapist

Traveling Massage

I am also looking to do this starting from WA. I think that the more of us who do it, the more accepting of the general public. I plan on doing this next year starting at the beginning of summer.

I will stay a week or less in each state and set up my table and tent any where it looks good. Rest stops, small town festivals, at the beach, city parks. If they kick me out, then off to the next stop I will go. I probably won't spend a lot of time in RV parks as I want to see the country, not just meet other RVers.

There is no national license and your license is not recognized in all states. I will spend the greatest amount of time in states that do not require state certification. If I am in a place that I really like, I would probably get a temporary business license. New York has REALLY strict laws and licensing/school hours requirements so I probably won't work in that state.

Also, I will want to take credit and debit. I can do this as long as I have a internet signal for the laptop.

Post again and let me know how things work for all of you.

On Site Massage Therapist

Please make sure you comply with all the state regulations, and that your liability insurance is current.

Market yourself as a massage therapist, not a masseur or masseuse. You don't want people to get the wrong idea.

Contact the American Massage Therapy Association and local state health departments as different states have different laws.

More Info on Mobile Massage

I have been researching this topic since I've decided to give it a try.

It is true for the most part, and some states I will avoid no matter what, like New York and Nebraska. If you are in a place for a few days no one will probably say anything. Make sure the place that you are at knows you are there and what you will be doing.

My idea was to follow events, RV rallys (whatever your rig is there are groups that get together at rallys), sporting events, fairs, etc. I would set up a tent, hire a locally licensed therapist, and supply the table, chairs, and other stuff, take appointments and the money, pay them for the work they do as an independent contractor (sign paperwork for the IRS) and only massage when needed.

Under the 48 hour rule that is two days in any location, and the odds of someone inspecting are pretty slim. Unless someone complains about you, you probably could do it for a little longer.

I would have a business license, be incorporated, licensed (Florida), insured (IMP), belong to the AMTA, and be nationally certified with a current CPR certificate.

If you have any other ideas I would love to hear them.

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